July 24th, 2014

Ask the Archivist: More Moon Toons

by The King

 THE DAY THE AFTER: HEARST COVERAGE ON 21 JULY 1969.

Greetings, Earthlings!

Two weeks ago, (see here), I shared some of the strips that ran on the day of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing. Because it proved so popular with readers, today we give you a second helping.

                                                     THE BETTER HALF by Bob Barnes

 

 BONER’S ARK by Addison (Mort Walker)

 BRICK BRADFORD by Paul Norris
 

 

                                                   CAPTAIN KATE by Jerry & Hale Skelly

 HEART OF JULIET JONES by Stan Drake

 HENRY by John Liney

 HI & LOIS by Mort Walker & Dik Browne

 

 KATZENJAMMER KIDS by Joe Musial
 THE LITTLE KING by Otto Soglow

 THE LITTLE WOMAN by Don Tobin

MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN by Lee Falk & Fred Fredricks

 REDEYE by Gordon Bess

 THEY’LL DO IT EVERY TIME by Dunn & Scaduto

                                                                      TIGER by Bud Blake

 TIM TYLER’S LUCK by Lyman Young & Tom Massey

 

  

                                                  TRUDY by Jerry Marcus

Moving along to reader comments and questions from last week’s post …

To Pretty Boy: 
Quite a lot of films were made based on comics! I think it was a quick way for inexpensive productions to attract a readymade audience, which would appeal to exhibitors. Whether most were good or bad didn’t matter much, though, it would seem.

To Old Thoth:
Despite being a top strip, I can think of only one other collection, a Cupples & Leon book of 1921. It says, “First Series” on the cover, but there was only one. I think that Fontaine Fox might have guarded the licensing of the actual cartoons too closely.

To Fusionater:
I am in fact a wizened old gnome sitting in a cave full of musty artifacts brought back from the Crusades, like Merlin, at the top of the Hearst Tower in New York.

When did comic strips become a “legitimate” medium? I guess they never will garner the full respect that literature or theatre gets, because of their all too popular character. Highbrow comics could never be profitable. So, they fit in perfectly with the movies, which began at the same time comics did.

 Yours until next week,

THE ARCHIVE KEEPER

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