The Comics Kingdom Blog

Ask the Archivist: December 8, 1941

It’s been seventy-five years since we were thrust into World War Two by way of the Japanese strike on  our armed forces in Hawaii. Five years ago we looked at the comics that appeared on the actual day of the attack:

http://comicskingdom.com/blog/2011/12/07/ask-the-archivist-december-7-1941

Today we’ll see some of the KFS strips that ran the next day, the Monday following, or, technically the first day of the war with the United States as a combatant.   It was the day that Congress authorized President Roosevelt to declare war on Japan with his immortal speech which included the phrase “With confidence in our armed  forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph-So help us God.” And so we did. This is our modest way of making a tribute.

Hearst coverage of the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack: (right) The New York Journal-American reports on the declaration of war on 8 December 1941. (Left) After the outrage of the sneak attack, some panic-stricken fear headlines followed, like this one of 9 December. Others included a sighting of an ominous “Black Fleet” of mystery planes headed toward New York. Didn’t happen. Thankfully, there were no enemy actions over Manhattan or Frisco throughout the war.
Hearst coverage of the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack: (right) The New York Journal-American reports on the declaration of war on 8 December 1941. (Left) After the outrage of the sneak attack, some panic-stricken fear headlines followed, like this one of 9 December. Others included a sighting of an ominous “Black Fleet” of mystery planes headed toward New York. Didn’t happen. Thankfully, there were no enemy actions over Manhattan or Frisco throughout the war.
BARNEY GOOGLE AND SNUFFY SMITH by Billy DeBeck  BRICK BRADFORD by Ritt and Gray  ETTA KETT by Paul Robinson  FELIX THE CAT by Otto Mesmer  FLASH GORDON by Austin Briggs  HENRY by Carl Anderson
BARNEY GOOGLE AND SNUFFY SMITH by Billy DeBeck
BRICK BRADFORD by Ritt and Gray
ETTA KETT by Paul Robinson
FELIX THE CAT by Otto Mesmer
FLASH GORDON by Austin Briggs
HENRY by Carl Anderson

 

THE OLD HOME TOWN by Lee W. Stanley  THEY’LL DO IT EVERY TIME By Jimmy Hatlo  KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED by Jim Gary  KRAZY KAT by George Herriman  LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY by Brandon Walsh  MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN by Falk and Davis  MUGGS AND SKEETER by Wally Bishop  POLLY AND HER PALS by Cliff Sterrett
THE OLD HOME TOWN by Lee W. Stanley
THEY’LL DO IT EVERY TIME By Jimmy Hatlo
KING OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED by Jim Gary
KRAZY KAT by George Herriman
LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY by Brandon Walsh
MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN by Falk and Davis
MUGGS AND SKEETER by Wally Bishop
POLLY AND HER PALS by Cliff Sterrett
RIGHT AROUND HOME by Dudley Fisher  SERGEANT PAT OF RADIO PATROL by Sullivan and Schmidt  THIMBLE THEATRE by Bela Zaboly  TILLIE THE TOILER by Russ Westover  TIM TYLER’S LUCK by Lyman Young  TOOTS AND CASPER by Jimmy Murphy
RIGHT AROUND HOME by Dudley Fisher
SERGEANT PAT OF RADIO PATROL by Sullivan and Schmidt
THIMBLE THEATRE by Bela Zaboly
TILLIE THE TOILER by Russ Westover
TIM TYLER’S LUCK by Lyman Young
TOOTS AND CASPER by Jimmy Murphy
TO John W Kennedy-
 
Sorry we had a bit of  glitch last week; but it was quickly dealt with.
We got on it only a few hours later.
 
TO Rodrigo Araya-
 
The strips of the early period, say 1900-15, usually concentrate on the male half
of a marriage, where his wife is regarded as one among many sources of his various
problems. Pretty girls in strips are mostly used as love interests for the hero if he’s
single, or temptation on the way to painful reprisal if he’s hitched. The Newlyweds
were a fresh idea because they were a young newlywed couple. Their conspicuous
surname attests to their novelty.  As for the characters appearance, most young ladies
are beautiful, and their appeal is universal. And as most cartoonists have
been men, we would like to see that all the young women are lovely. That we
often depict ourselves as goofy-looking reflects  a bit of truth, after all, most men are not
all that good looking. Ugly is masculine. Which is fine because it still leaves us attractive
to women. Though I notice in the works of the classic feminine pen-pushers like Nell
Brinkley, Grace Drayton or Fay King, their handsome young men always seem pretty
enough to compete with the girls!
 
TO Rick Boyer-
 
As I related to our friend Mumblix back on 3 November, DeBeck loved to make up
catchphrases and slang words. He was at one time quite successful in putting them 
over. “Horsefeathers”,
TO John W Kennedy-
 
   Sorry we had a bit of  glitch last week; but it was quickly dealt with.
We got on it only a few hours later.
 
TO Rodrigo Araya-
 
      The strips of the early period, say 1900-15, usually concentrate on the male half
of a marriage, where his wife is regarded as one among many sources of his various
problems. Pretty girls in strips are mostly used as love interests for the hero if he’s
single, or temptation on the way to painful reprisal if he’s hitched. The Newlyweds
were a fresh idea because they were a young newlywed couple. Their conspicuous
surname attests to their novelty.         As for the characters appearance- most
young ladies are beautiful, and their appeal is universal. And as most cartoonists have
been men, we would like to see that all the young women are lovely. That we
often depict ourselves as goofy looking reflects  a bit of truth, after all, men are not
all that good looking. Ugly is masculine. Which is fine because it still leaves us attractive
to women. Though I notice in the works of the classic feminine pen pushers like Nell
Brinkley, Grace Drayton or Fay King, their handsome young men always seem pretty
enough to compete with the girls!
 
TO Rick Boyer-
 
   As I related to our friend Mumblix back on 3 November, DeBeck loved to make up
catchphrases and slang words. He was at one time quite successful in putting them 
over, “Horsefeathers”, “Heebie-Jeebies”  and “Bodacious” being recognizable even
today. His modus operandi is on display in the currently running strips: keep repeating
it, even if you have to stuff it in the background somewhere as a non sequitur. As I said
last month, he really didn’t go anywhere with this “Choseff” catchphrase because I think
DeBeck was getting sicker and Lasswell was taking over more and more in 1942.  Then,
Lasswell was in the army and wasn’t able to be working side by side with him, so  the
phrase was abandoned.
 
To Dorila Berraso-
 
Another way to get a Toots & Casper fix would be  to go to the Old Fulton NY Post Cards
site, where you’ll see files of the Mount Vernon Daily Argus from the 1920s, Pelham Sun
from the 1930s, as well as Hearst’s Albany Times-Union and  Syracuse Journal. But be
warned, these files can be a real chore to get through, and in the last two mentioned,
the source materials used look like lab seconds or even highly deteriorated microfilm.
 
Yours,
 
The King Features Archivist.
 

 

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